Indian climate activist, 10, invited to East Timor inauguration | Climate Crisis News

Among the many individuals attending the inauguration ceremony of East Timor’s new President José Ramos-Horta shall be a 10-year-old local weather activist from India.

Licypriya Kangujam was invited as a particular visitor of honour for the inauguration of the Nobel Peace Prize laureate on Thursday, a day earlier than Asia’s youngest nation marks the twentieth anniversary of its independence.

East Timor, formally often known as Timor-Leste, was colonised by Portugal within the 18th century and remained beneath its management till 1975. When the Portuguese withdrew, troops from Indonesia invaded and annexed the island nation as its twenty seventh province.

A UN-sponsored referendum for freedom held in 1999 and a brutal retreat by Indonesian forces noticed the nation of 1.3 million individuals emerge as a republic three years later.

Ap Photo child activism climate
Kangujam holding an indication at Juhu seashore throughout a cleansing drive in Mumbai [File: Rajanish Kakade/AP]

‘Invitation very particular’

Kangujam, who’s the founding father of The Baby Motion environmental organisation, advised Al Jazeera she was “very shocked” when she first obtained the invitation to attend the high-profile occasion.

“Often at such massive occasions, solely international presidents and prime ministers are invited as particular visitors. I really feel this invitation could be very particular and has an amazing message on how small island international locations like East Timor are threatened by local weather change,” she mentioned.

“The inclusion of local weather activists in each subject and decision-making course of is kind of necessary.”

The kid activist mentioned her go to would strengthen relations between India and East Timor.

Licypriya Kangujam
Licypriya performs together with her sister Irina at house in Noida as their mom Bidyarani seems to be on [File: Anushree Fadnavis/Reuters]

Kangujam was born in a village close to Imphal within the northeastern Indian state of Manipur. When she was 5, her household moved to Bhubaneswar within the coastal state of Odisha, the place Cyclone Titli in 2018 and Cyclone Fani in 2019 killed lots of of individuals and destroyed houses.

On the age of 9, Kangujam moved to Noida on the outskirts of the Indian capital New Delhi, one of many world’s most polluted cities, the place she lives together with her mom and a youthful sister.

The fifth-grade pupil says the local weather disaster in Odisha and New Delhi’s air pollution points left a deep impression on her and turned her into one of many world’s youngest local weather activists.

In 2019, she addressed world leaders on the United Nations Local weather Convention 2019 (COP25) in Madrid, urging them to take rapid actions to avoid wasting the way forward for kids like her.

Licypriya Kangujam
Kangujam speaks in the course of the UN Local weather Change Convention (COP25) in Madrid [File: Susana Vera/Reuters]

The younger activist says she was alone when she began her motion in 2018. “However right now I’ve love and assist from hundreds of individuals throughout the globe.”

A number of international dignitaries are attending Ramos-Horta’s inauguration ceremony.

US President Joe Biden on Monday introduced a presidential delegation to the nation, based on a White Home assertion.

Ramos-Horta, who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1996 for his efforts to deliver a peaceable decision to the battle in East Timor, scored a landslide victory within the presidential election final month.

The Nobel laureate beforehand served as president from 2007 to 2012 and was additionally the nation’s first prime minister.

‘Will hearken to their tales’

East Timor is extremely susceptible to local weather change, with rising sea ranges, frequent floods, cyclones, droughts, landslides and soil erosion.

Final 12 months, Tropical Cyclone Seroja killed dozens of individuals within the nation whereas 7,000 have been displaced.

Throughout her go to to East Timor, Kangujam will deal with the nation’s parliament and go to the College of East Timor. She mentioned civil society organisations within the nation have additionally invited her to work together with kids and younger individuals there.

“I’ll hearken to their tales and also will inform the world in regards to the issues they’re dealing with. We are going to speak about long-term peace and growth and the way we will struggle local weather change collectively,” she advised Al Jazeera.

“My voice will characterize the unheard voices of the tens of millions of individuals of the world and likewise for the numerous, unvoiced animals.”

US wildfire dangers seen spreading east as climate risks grow | Climate Crisis News

From New Jersey to Georgia, US states 1000’s of kilometres from wildfire hotspots within the west face a rising danger from forest blazes as world warming makes “protected havens” more and more uncommon, researchers have warned.

Wildfires pose at the very least a average danger to greater than 30 million properties throughout america, in accordance with modelling by First Road Basis, a nonprofit that maps local weather dangers.

“Wildfire danger is growing a lot sooner than even flood danger is throughout the US,” mentioned Ed Kearns, the group’s chief knowledge officer, on Monday. “And it’s more likely to have an effect on areas that aren’t regarded as wildfire-prone areas proper now, however will probably be quickly.”

Properly past hard-hit states akin to California and New Mexico, East Coast areas together with South and North Carolina are amongst these with essentially the most properties threatened by fires, analysis discovered.

It used a brand new mannequin supposed to offer house and different property homeowners an in depth danger evaluation of the climate-related threats dealing with their properties, together with wildfires and floods.

“That skill for a person to take a seat down and kind of their deal with and see what their danger is makes a private connection between local weather change and this knowledge set and their lives,” Kearns mentioned.

Info graphic of wildfires on the rise

A handful of counties in Georgia state, for instance, have been amongst these with the most important projected rise within the share of properties with at the very least average wildfire danger between now and 2052.

The researchers checked out about 140 million properties nationwide, together with residential and business buildings, in addition to very important infrastructure together with faculties and airports.

They discovered near 80 million folks face a point of danger, with 30.4 million dealing with at the very least “average” danger.

That corresponds to an annual “burn likelihood” of 0.03 p.c or extra, or at the very least a 1 p.c cumulative probability of experiencing a wildfire in the course of the lifetime of a 30-year mortgage.

‘Select your poison’

Wildfire danger is way extra prevalent than researchers had anticipated earlier than creating the mannequin, mentioned Matthew Eby, First Road Basis’s founder and govt director.

Western states that already face vital danger will see that worsen over time with local weather change, together with locations akin to California, New Mexico, and Colorado which are accustomed to coping with main blazes, the report mentioned.

However different locations within the Midwest and South are already in danger, it famous. South Carolina and North Carolina each characteristic among the many prime US states for the variety of properties with at the very least a average danger of experiencing a wildfire in 2022.

Michael Wehner, a senior scientist on the Lawrence Berkeley Nationwide Laboratory in California who was not concerned within the report, mentioned it was robust to flee the “detrimental” results of rising temperatures.

“Regardless of the place you reside, there’s one thing unhealthy popping out of local weather change – whether or not hearth or drought or larger storms or heatwaves – select your poison,” he mentioned.

Jonathon Golden, a former wildland firefighter, mentioned East Coast residents have been much less accustomed to fires than folks residing within the west.

“Local weather change is de facto going to shock lots of people, and so they’re going to see loads of issues that they haven’t seen earlier than of their lives,” he mentioned.

Past the risk to lives, livelihoods and property, the increasing hazard zone threatens to place additional pressure on federal firefighters at a time when many are sounding the alarm about low pay and unsafe working circumstances.

Historically, when work on fires has been accomplished out west, federal sources shift east to help with “hurricane obligation”, Golden mentioned.

However now there may very well be an ideal storm lining up of overlapping hurricane and hearth seasons, he warned.

“That’s actually going to emphasize and pressure sources with the ability to reply to each incidents on the similar time,” he mentioned.

Pakistan city hits nearly 50C as blistering heatwave grips nation | Climate Crisis News

Elements of the nation already scorched by temperatures of almost 50Cs as officers warn of acute water shortages and a risk to well being.

Pakistan is within the grip of a blistering heatwave, with elements of the nation already scorched by temperatures of almost 50C as officers warn of acute water shortages and a risk to well being.

Swathes of Pakistan have been smothered by excessive temperatures since late April, in excessive climate the World Meteorological Group (WMO) has warned is in keeping with local weather change.

On Thursday, the town of Jacobabad in Sindh province hit 49.5C (121F), the Pakistan Meteorological Division (PMD) mentioned, with temperatures forecast to stay the identical till the tip of the week.

Nationwide, the PMD alerted temperatures have been between 6C (11F) and 9C (16F) above regular, with the capital Islamabad, in addition to provincial hubs Karachi, Lahore and Peshawar, recording temperatures round 40C (104F) on Friday afternoon.

“This 12 months we’ve got jumped from winter proper into summer time,” mentioned PMD Chief Forecaster Zaheer Ahmad Babar.

Pakistan has endured heightened heatwaves since 2015, he mentioned, centered in higher Sindh province and southern Punjab province.

“The depth is rising, and the period is rising, and the frequency is rising,” he mentioned.

Punjab province irrigation spokesperson Adnan Hassan mentioned the Indus river – Pakistan’s key waterway – had shrunk by 65 p.c “on account of a scarcity of rains and snow” this 12 months.

Sheep have reportedly died from heatstroke and dehydration within the Cholistan Desert of Punjab, Pakistan’s most populous province which additionally serves because the nationwide breadbasket.

“There’s a actual hazard of a shortfall in meals and crop provide this 12 months within the nation ought to the water scarcity persist,” Hassan mentioned.

On Tuesday, Local weather Minister Sherry Rehman warned residents within the jap megacity of Lahore “to take cowl for the most well liked hours of the day”.

Pakistan, residence to 220 million folks, says it’s accountable for lower than one p.c of worldwide greenhouse gasoline emissions.

Nonetheless, it ranks because the eighth most affected nation by excessive climate occasions, in accordance with a 2021 research by environmental group Germanwatch.

Whereas excessive warmth has apparent results, it might probably additionally set off cascading disasters which pummel Pakistan’s usually impoverished inhabitants.

The mountainous parts of Pakistan are residence to greater than 7,000 glaciers, a quantity bigger than any area exterior the poles.

Rapidly melting glaciers can swell lakes which then burst their banks and unleash torrents of ice, rock and water in occasions often known as glacial lake outburst floods.

Final weekend, a key freeway bridge within the Gilgit-Baltistan area was swept away in flash flooding brought on by glacier soften.

In April, officers warned there have been 33 lakes in Pakistan at risk of unleashing related harmful deluges.

The heatwave has additionally ravaged India, with temperatures in elements of Rajasthan state hitting 48.1C (118.5F) on Thursday.

A bit rich? Billionaires’ climate efforts draw scepticism, praise | Coronavirus pandemic

Australia’s second-richest particular person, mining magnate Andrew “Twiggy” Forrest, is understood to his admirers as a down-to-earth, straight-shooting businessman reduce from the identical fabric as self-made billionaires Jeff Bezos and Invoice Gates.

And like his contemporaries in america, Forrest, the chairman of Fortescue Metals, the world’s fourth-largest iron ore producer, has taken on a number one position within the battle in opposition to local weather change.

Forrest is spending $114 billion Australian {dollars} ($81bn), together with 3 billion Australian {dollars} ($2.13bn) of his personal cash, to construct the world’s largest electrolyser, an equipment that separates water into oxygen and hydrogen. Powered by wind and photo voltaic vitality, it is going to produce an emissions-free vitality supply and guarantees to decarbonise Asia’s metal mills.

“Inexperienced electrical energy, inexperienced ammonia and inexperienced hydrogen can cowl 100 p.c of the world’s carbon emissions,” Forrest stated throughout a chat on the Nationwide Press Membership in Canberra in October.

Local weather advocacy by billionaires resembling Forrest has polarised environmental activists and commentators. Whereas some welcome the tremendous rich’s newfound give attention to the local weather, others query whether or not their actions could be seen as altruistic after they amassed fortunes, and proceed to rake in billions, from closely polluting industries.

Fortescue Metals emitted 2.2 million tonnes of carbon final 12 months, in accordance with Australia’s Clear Vitality Regulator, not together with 241 million tonnes emitted by the smelting of the corporate’s iron ore in China.

“Apart from [Australia’s richest person and fellow mining magnate] Gina Rinehart, no Australian has ever triggered extra injury to the setting than Andrew Forrest,” an Australian Monetary Evaluate columnist stated in a current commentary.

Jeff Bezos
Jeff Bezos created a $10bn fund for local weather change in 2020, whereas his firm Amazon emitted greater than 60 million tonnes of carbon that 12 months [File: Joshua Roberts/Reuters]

Bezos brings a equally blended observe report to the desk. In 2020, he created a $10bn fund for local weather change. However his firm Amazon emitted greater than 60 million tonnes of carbon that 12 months – 15 p.c greater than in 2019 – while hauling in a report $386bn in income.

In response to a report by Oxfam and the Stockholm Surroundings Institute, the world’s wealthiest 1 p.c are accountable for 15 p.c of carbon emissions – practically twice as a lot because the world’s poorest 50 p.c.

Equally, simply 1 p.c of the world’s inhabitants is accountable for half the emissions attributable to aviation, whereas virtually 90 p.c of individuals hardly fly, in accordance with analysis by the Western Norway Analysis Institute.

Invoice Gates, who final 12 months revealed his ebook The way to Keep away from a Local weather Catastrophe, has an annual carbon footprint of seven,493 tonnes, principally from flying on personal jets, in accordance with an Indiana College research on the carbon footprints of billionaires. That’s practically 3,000 instances extra carbon than the common particular person in Fiji creates in a 12 months and not less than 11,350 instances greater than the common particular person in Laos.

“In relation to local weather change and carbon emissions, our analysis over the previous 30 years exhibits the stark distinction between the emissions attributable to the tremendous wealthy in comparison with poor people,” Stockholm Surroundings Institute scientist Emily Ghosh instructed Al Jazeera. “So although they’re principally accountable, they’re those deciding the answer.”

In lots of instances, billionaires’ proposed options contain costly nascent know-how like inexperienced hydrogen that, if efficiently scaled, will create new monopolies that management consumption patterns for many years, Ghosh stated.

“We have to cease magical options,” she stated. “That’s what obtained us right here within the first place and I’m nervous that we will go down the identical path the place we’re locked into one know-how and not a range of vitality choices.”

‘Battle of curiosity’

One other potential battle of curiosity regarding a billionaire climate-change fighter is taking form in Australia within the lead-up to the federal election on Could 21.

Simon Holmes a Court docket, son of the nation’s first billionaire Robert Holmes a Court docket, is doling out thousands and thousands of {dollars} by way of Local weather 200, a personal fund, to candidates who set the very best emissions targets of their electorates. Because the founding father of Decarb Ventures, an funding agency targeted on renewable know-how, Holmes a Court docket may stand to revenue if his candidates win workplace.

“These billionaires who’ve enormous investments in renewable industries will argue that there’s nothing incorrect with donating cash to politicians. However I see a transparent battle of curiosity,” Daniel Lewkovitz, a candidate for the pro-free market Liberal Democrats whose opponent Allegra Spender obtained 60,000 Australian {dollars} from Local weather 200, instructed Al Jazeera. “And if the one factor the independents cared about was decreasing carbon emissions, they might all be in favour of nuclear vitality as I’m. Allegra Spender refuses to debate with me about nuclear vitality.”

Spender was not instantly obtainable for remark. Holmes a Court docket and Local weather 200 didn’t reply to enquiries, whereas Forrest declined to touch upon perceptions of his twin position as local weather hero and polluter.

When requested by Australian tv not too long ago if his new mission to interchange fossil fuels with inexperienced hydrogen was pushed by disgrace, Forrest stated he had “exactly no disgrace”.

“Now, if I did nothing about it once I knew I may, then I might have disgrace,” he stated.

The Australasian Centre for Company Accountability, a shareholder advocacy organisation, has described Forrest’s plan as a “daring and welcome dedication”, including that his rivals BHP and Rio Tinto, the world’s second and third-largest iron-ore producers, “must be embarrassed by being outdone” by a smaller agency.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has been among the many most high-profile advocates of free enterprise and innovation as an answer to the local weather disaster, arguing for “can-do capitalism” over “don’t do governments”.

“Simply because the animal spirits of enterprise have labored along with scientists and technologists to vary the world previously … I’m greater than satisfied they maintain the reply to fixing the problem of a decarbonised economic system,” Morrison instructed a enterprise occasion in November.

Smoke billows from the cooling towers of a coal fired power station in australia
Billionaires’ efforts to cut back carbon emissions have polarised commentators [File: Saeed Khan/AFP]

Nonetheless, Fortescue Metals will proceed to pump thousands and thousands of tonnes of carbon into the ambiance for not less than one other eight years, in accordance with the firm’s 2030 carbon neutrality plan.

Quite than trying to billionaires to “wave their magic wands”, Ghosh on the Stockholm Surroundings Institute believes “options ought to come from the underside in addition to the highest as a result of one answer is not going to match into each area”.

“We have to take a look at context-specific options and take heed to the people who find themselves residing there, particularly these already affected by local weather change and those that have all the time lived sustainably,” she stated.

However, increasingly billionaires are throwing their hats into the ring.

This week, Australia’s third-richest particular person, Mike Cannon-Brookes, co-founder of software program large Atlassian, purchased an 11 p.c stake in AGL Vitality, the nation’s largest company contributor to carbon emissions, in a bid to cease a proposed demerger that might see its coal vegetation function till 2045.

Cannon-Brookes, who desires to rework AGL by pumping 20 billion Australian {dollars} into renewable vitality and battery storage, has described his plan as the biggest single decarbonisation mission on this planet.

“We’re at a crucial level in Australia’s vitality transition and in AGL’s future,” the billionaire stated in an announcement.

Dario Kenner, creator of Carbon Inequality. The Function of the Richest in Local weather Change, stated Cannon-Brookes’ methodology is flawed.

“The urgency of the local weather disaster means there isn’t time to inexperienced one firm, like AGL, at a time,” he instructed Al Jazeera. “Earlier vitality transitions have been closely formed by governments, and that’s what might want to occur once more to cut back the economy-wide use of oil, gasoline and coal as quick as potential.”

Hundreds flee homes in US southwest as massive wildfire advances | Climate News

The Calf Canyon Wildfire east of Santa Fe, New Mexico, scorches a swath of land, threatens mountain communities.

Wind-whipped flames raced throughout pine-covered mountainsides within the US state of New Mexico on Monday, forcing residents to flee their houses and resulting in the evacuation of the state’s psychiatric hospital.

Lots of of households in an historic metropolis within the foothills of the Rocky Mountains have been instructed to evacuate instantly as intense winds and bone-dry situations fuelled the massive wildfire burning on the outskirts of city.

The blaze, dubbed the Calf Canyon Wildfire, had scorched greater than 41,682 hectares (102,998 acres), or greater than half the realm of New York Metropolis, as of Monday morning, in accordance with United States Forest Service officers in New Mexico.

It was 30 p.c contained as of Monday because it burned drought-parched vegetation northwest of the town of Las Vegas, dwelling to 13,000 folks.

“We’re making an attempt to accommodate and feed folks with skeleton crews. Lots of of individuals have misplaced their houses. It’s a rare tragedy,” mentioned Allen Affeldt, who owns a lodge in Las Vegas.

Thousands of firefighters and National Guard troops are battling destructive wildfires in the Southwest as more residents are preparing to evacuate.
1000’s of firefighters and Nationwide Guard troops are battling harmful wildfires within the southwest as extra residents are getting ready to evacuate [New Mexico National Guard via AP]

The hearth, the most important lively US wildfire proper now, is certainly one of a dozen blazes now burning within the southwestern United States. Scientists say wildfires are extra widespread and arriving earlier this 12 months on account of local weather change.

Greater than 3,100 wildland firefighters and assist personnel have been combating fires throughout the nation, with about one-third of them making an attempt to stop the large blaze in New Mexico from spreading.

“This can be very smoked out right here. A number of smoke and falling ash,” Jesus Romero, the deputy county supervisor of San Miguel County, instructed the Reuters information company in an interview.

“The winds are beginning to decide up now and we’re beginning to get much more wind.”

Forecasters issued a pink flag warning for the realm, signalling that fires might begin and unfold simply, amid winds of 80kph (50mph) and humidity as little as 5 p.c anticipated by Monday.

State well being officers mentioned they started evacuating all 197 sufferers on the Behavioral Well being Institute because of the fast-moving hearth.

Sufferers have been being despatched to different amenities across the state, with some being transported in secured models and others escorted by police.

A number of hundred households within the northwestern nook of Las Vegas have been instructed to evacuate instantly on Monday morning, San Miguel County mentioned in an alert.

“This rising scenario stays extraordinarily severe and refusal to evacuate may very well be a deadly choice,” the county mentioned.

One other 4,000 to five,000 folks have been instructed to be able to evacuate instantly, Romero mentioned.

Crews bulldozed hearth breaks to the north and west of the historic college city to guard ranches, rural homes and the United World Faculty.

A New Mexico National Guard truck is ready to deliver potable water to communities in response to the Calf Canyon/Hermits Peak fire in northern New Mexico.
A New Mexico Nationwide Guard truck is able to ship potable water to communities in response to the hearth [New Mexico National Guard via AP]

Officers have mentioned the northeastern New Mexico hearth, which has been burning since April 6, has broken or destroyed 172 houses and at the very least 116 buildings.

The residents of close by communities have been instructed to evacuate on Sunday as robust wind gusts drove the hearth close to their mountain valley communities.

Throughout New Mexico, officers and teams have been amassing meals, water and different provides for the 1000’s of individuals displaced by the fires.

Affords of prayers and hope flooded social media as residents posted pictures of the flames torching the tops of towering ponderosa pines close to their houses.

Forecasters have issued hearth climate watches and pink flag warnings for excessive hearth hazard throughout extensive swaths of New Mexico and western Texas.