‘Shameful’: US protests potential Roe v Wade abortion rollback | Women News

Al Jazeera speaks to protesters outdoors the US Supreme Courtroom concerning the potential overturning of the Roe v Wade abortion ruling.

Washington, DC – Hundreds of individuals have protested outdoors the US Supreme Courtroom in opposition to a possible rollback of abortion rights in america, after a draft determination to overturn the nation’s landmark Roe v Wade ruling was leaked.

Politico journal first reported Monday night on the Supreme Courtroom’s majority draft opinion to strike down the precedent-setting 1973 determination, which set out a lady’s proper to an abortion within the nation.

Chief Justice John Roberts confirmed on Tuesday that the draft was “genuine”, however he burdened it was not remaining and ordered an investigation into what he mentioned was an “egregious” leak.

Whereas the abortion concern inflames strongly held beliefs within the US, a majority of Individuals assist Roe v Wade. In keeping with a Washington Put up-ABC Information ballot performed late final month, 54 % of individuals assume the Supreme Courtroom ought to uphold the ruling, in contrast with 28 % who mentioned it needs to be overturned.

Outdoors the Supreme Courtroom on Tuesday, the variety of protesters denouncing the draft ruling vastly outnumbered these in favour. Al Jazeera spoke to demonstrators about what the potential finish of Roe v Wade means to them.

Emily Cramer, 32, professor at Howard College, mom of two

Protester Emily Cramer outside US Supreme Court
Emily Cramer says she feels ‘morally dejected’ by Supreme Courtroom’s draft determination [William Roberts/Al Jazeera]

“I discovered about this leaked determination and I’m afraid and feeling morally dejected. And after the previous 5 years, I’ve discovered the one factor that makes me really feel higher is protesting.

“The end result of this determination is the undoing of years and years of ladies’s rights. Girls ought to be capable of time their pregnancies in a means that advantages their lives and their well being. I’m afraid of what this implies for my kids and tens of millions of others sooner or later.”

Amy Marden, 37, lawyer from Wisconsin, at present residing in Virginia

Amy Marden, 37, lawyer from Wisconsin
Amy Marden, 37, says she fears no rights are secure within the US [William Roberts/Al Jazeera]

“A good friend of mine despatched me a information story – a Politico information story – final evening and I referred to as my mother and we cried. My mother was out right here combating for abortion rights within the ’70s.

“Truthfully, if we don’t have precedent in our nation, we don’t have rights. None of our rights are secure.”

Eesha Bhave (left), 27, from Wayne, New Jersey and Krithika Harish, 32, of Washington, DC

Protesters stand outside Supreme Court of US
Each Bhave and Harish condemned the potential rollback of Roe v Wade [William Roberts/Al Jazeera]

Harish: “I’m right here due to the choice that was leaked final evening. We’re imminently about to lose the correct to secure and authorized abortions on this nation. And I’m angered, outraged and upset.

“It’s inconceivable to me that my future daughter might need much less rights than 50 years in the past.”

Bhave: “After [the] information was leaked, I considered all of the individuals who received’t have that selection – whether or not to have a toddler or not.

“It’s simply shameful they’re attempting to remove [the] long-held proper of ladies to have the ability to have management over their our bodies.”

Hayden Laye, 16, from Walhalla, South Carolina

Hayden Laye, 16
Laye, 16, says he’s celebrating the potential finish of Roe v Wade [William Roberts/Al Jazeera]

“We’re out right here celebrating what could possibly be the tip of Roe v Wade and what could possibly be the tip of the best human rights violation in human historical past.”

Steve Corson, 65, from Fredonia, Arizona

Steve Corson, 65, from Fredonia, Arizona
Corson (proper) says he’s ‘pro-life from a Christian standpoint’ [William Roberts/Al Jazeera]

“I’m pro-life all the best way and I’m simply so completely satisfied the Supreme Courtroom is lastly going to eliminate Roe v Wade.

“I’m pro-life from a Christian standpoint and a pure standpoint. Not one of the different creatures kill their infants within the womb. Human beings are the one ones who do this.”

Ukraine’s ‘finest hour’: UK’s Johnson addresses lawmakers in Kyiv | Russia-Ukraine war News

Prime Minister Boris Johnson additionally introduced one other navy support bundle as he spoke to legislators through video hyperlink.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has introduced one other £300m ($376m) in the UK’s navy support for Ukraine as he hailed resistance to Russia as its “most interesting hour” in a distant tackle to parliament in Kyiv.

Johnson used Tuesday’s speech delivered through video hyperlink, the primary by a international chief to Ukraine’s Verkhovna Rada since Russia invaded on February 24, to commend Kyiv’s forces for preventing “with the vitality and braveness of lions”.

“That is Ukraine’s most interesting hour, that will likely be remembered and recounted for generations to come back,” mentioned Johnson, a phrase first utilized by the World Struggle II-era British chief Winston Churchill in a speech in 1940.

Johnson mentioned Ukraine’s resistance had “exploded the parable” that Russian President Vladimir Putin’s forces have been invincible and “written some of the superb chapters in navy historical past and within the lifetime of your nation”.

“The so-called irresistible power of Putin’s conflict machine has damaged on the immoveable object of Ukrainian patriotism and love of nation,” he added, arguing the Russian chief was “sowing the seeds of disaster for himself and for his nation”.

The brand new navy help, which can embrace digital warfare gear, a counter-battery radar system, GPS jamming gear and 1000’s of night time imaginative and prescient gadgets, is the most recent defensive support from London.

It represents a ramping up of help, after beforehand dispatching about £450m in navy gear to Kyiv in a number of levels.

‘Lengthy-term objective’

Final week, the UK mentioned it could ship Ukraine armoured automobiles capable of fireplace missiles in opposition to invading Russian plane, on high of earlier contributions which have included anti-tank missiles, air defence techniques and tonnes of plastic explosives.

It’s going to additionally dispatch within the coming weeks heavy-lift unmanned aerial automobile (UAV) techniques “to supply logistical help to remoted forces”, Johnson’s Downing Road workplace mentioned earlier than the tackle.

In the meantime, 13 new specialised Toyota Landcruisers are headed to Ukraine to assist shield civilian officers within the nation’s east and evacuate folks from front-line areas, it added.

The Kremlin has criticised Western international locations as they step up deliveries of navy {hardware}, saying they threat escalating the battle and warning Russia has the correct to answer any direct interventions.

However Johnson appeared undeterred, telling Ukrainian legislators the West would proceed provides “till we’ve achieved our long-term objective, which should be to fortify Ukraine in order that nobody will ever dare to assault you once more”.

On the diplomatic entrance, the UK can be reopening its embassy in Kyiv. The UK authorities has not confirmed when the embassy will reopen, however Simmons was current within the Verkhovna Rada to listen to Johnson’s speech.

The timing of the tackle, coming a month after Johnson met Zelenskyy in Kyiv, was questioned by some British opposition politicians, who mentioned it was a approach of boosting his rankings forward of native elections on Thursday.

Johnson’s spokesman denied it was an election stunt or a approach of distracting consideration from scandals over gatherings in Downing Road throughout a strict COVID-19 lockdown, saying the prime minister was decided to point out his help for Ukraine.

US employers posted record 11.5 million job openings in March | Unemployment News

A report 4.5 million Individuals stop their jobs in March, signalling they continue to be assured about job prospects.

Employers posted a report 11.5 million job openings in March, extra proof of a decent labour market that has emboldened tens of millions of American staff to hunt better-paying jobs and contributed to the largest surge in inflation in 4 many years.

A report 4.5 million Individuals stop their jobs in March — an indication that they’re assured they will discover higher pay or working circumstances elsewhere.

Layoffs, which had been working at about 1.8 million a month earlier than the pandemic hit the economic system in early 2020, ticked as much as 1.4 million in March from 1.35 million in February, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Tuesday.

America job market is on a sizzling streak. Employers have added a mean of greater than 540,000 jobs a month for the previous 12 months. The Labor Division is predicted to report on Friday that the economic system generated one other 400,000 new jobs in April, based on a survey by the info agency FactSet. That will mark an unprecedented twelfth straight month hiring has are available at 400,000 or extra.

The US economic system and job market roared again with surprising energy from 2020’s temporary however devastating coronavirus recession, fuelled by huge authorities spending and super-low charges engineered by the Federal Reserve.

Caught off guard by the sudden rebound in shopper demand, firms scrambled to rent staff and inventory their cabinets. They had been pressured to lift wages, and factories, ports and freight yards had been overwhelmed with visitors. The consequence has been transport delays and better costs.

In March, shopper costs rose 8.5 % from a 12 months earlier — the most popular inflation since 1981.

The place issues go from right here is unsure. The Fed is elevating short-term rates of interest to fight inflation. The COVID-19 stimulus from the federal authorities is gone. And the struggle in Ukraine has clouded the financial outlook. Regardless of robust hiring, the US remains to be 1.6 million wanting the roles it had in February 2020, simply earlier than the coronavirus hit the economic system; and that shortfall doesn’t take note of the extra jobs that ought to have been added by a rising inhabitants.

India: Curfew imposed in Jodhpur following Hindu-Muslim clashes | Religion News

Web connections minimize and a curfew imposed following unrest between Hindus and Muslims in Rajasthan state.

Authorities authorities have imposed a curfew and minimize off web connections in an space of Jodhpur, the capital of northern India’s Rajasthan state, following recent altercations between the Hindu and Muslim communities there.

Al Jazeera’s Elizabeth Puranam mentioned there was a “very heavy police presence” within the Jalori Gate space, following extra combating between the 2 teams.

The clashes started on Monday throughout spiritual festivals for each communities, every of whom needed to boost spiritual flags in the identical space. Muslims have been marking the top of Ramadan month of fasting, and Hindus have been celebrating a pageant known as Parshuram Jayanti.

Issues had calmed down in a single day, and Eid prayers befell on Tuesday peacefully. Nevertheless, clashes between Hindus and Muslims later erupted once more in at the least 5 completely different areas in Jalori Gate.

“Native media is saying at the least 10 folks have been injured and one particular person has been taken to hospital,” Puranam mentioned.

“Police tried to disperse the crowds utilizing batons and tear gasoline. The group then attacked a police put up and injured 4 officers.”

The curfew will stay in place till midnight native time.

Rajasthan’s Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot has despatched his residence secretary and senior officers to the realm to verify the violence doesn’t escalate, Puranam added.

Anti-Muslim sentiment and assaults have surged throughout the nation within the final month, together with stone throwing between Hindu and Muslim teams throughout spiritual processions and subsequent demolition of a lot of properties principally belonging to Muslims by authorities.

The Muslim neighborhood, which makes up 14 % of India’s 1.4 billion inhabitants, is reeling from vilification by hardline Hindu nationalists who’ve lengthy espoused an anti-Muslim stance.

Some leaders of India’s ruling Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Occasion have tacitly supported the violence, whereas Prime Minister Narendra Modi has to this point been silent about it.

“Many elements of the nation are on edge in the meanwhile,” Puranam mentioned.

Hindu leaders within the state of Maharashtra – residence to India’s monetary capital Mumbai – have given mosques a Might 4 deadline for them to take away their loudspeakers as a result of they are saying that the decision to prayer is noise air pollution, Puranam mentioned.

“They’re asking their followers to go to mosques on Wednesday and play Hindu songs at twice the amount of the decision to prayer if loudspeakers aren’t taken down,” she mentioned.

Roe v Wade: What is the US abortion ruling, can it be overturned? | Women’s Rights News

A leaked draft opinion by the US Supreme Court docket exhibits justices have voted to strike down the landmark 1973 Roe v Wade ruling, which created the inspiration for contemporary federal safety for the suitable to entry abortions within the US.

The leaked draft, revealed by Politico, doesn’t symbolize an official resolution on the matter, and there may be nonetheless the chance that votes may change as deliberations proceed.

Nonetheless, the bulk opinion, written by Justice Samuel Alito and reportedly supported by conservative justices, Clarence Thomas, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett strongly signifies the course wherein the conservative-controlled court docket is shifting on the matter.

The leaked opinion is about to turbo-charge the talk on a problem that has influenced US politics for many years.

Stephen Parlato of Boulder, Colo., holds a sign that reads "Hands Off Roe!!!" as abortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court.
Abortion rights advocates and anti-abortion rights demonstrators protest in entrance of the US Supreme Court docket [File: Andrew Harnik/AP Photo]

It was swiftly condemned by an array of rights teams, public officers, and residents.

In the meantime, protesters started gathering in entrance of the Washington, DC-based Supreme Court docket early on Tuesday.

What’s Roe v Wade?

Roe v Wade is a 1973 resolution by the Supreme Court docket which decided that the suitable to an abortion is protected beneath the US structure.

The justices dominated that whereas abortion is just not particularly referenced within the structure, it’s protected beneath rights to privateness which can be themselves protected beneath the structure’s ensures of liberty, notably throughout the ninth and 14th amendments, the latter of which prohibits a state from depriving “any particular person of life, liberty, or property, with out due means of regulation”.

Within the majority opinion, Justice Harry Blackmun argued that denying entry to abortion created excessive prices that included the specter of bodily and psychological harm to a lady, excessive monetary prices, and social stigma.

“We, subsequently, conclude that the suitable of private privateness consists of the abortion resolution, however that this proper is just not unqualified and have to be thought-about towards vital state pursuits in regulation,” he wrote.

The ruling created a three-tiered system that prohibited state bans on abortions throughout the first trimester, allowed states to implement abortion restrictions within the second trimester in cases the place the process was seen as harmful to a lady’s well being, and to fully ban the process within the third trimester except the mom’s life was threatened by carrying the beginning to time period.

How did Roe v Wade come about?

Jane Roe, later recognized as Norma McCorvey, was a Texas mom who sought an abortion after turning into pregnant together with her third baby.

On the time, Texas state regulation banned the process except being pregnant posed a risk to the girl’s life.

She launched a authorized problem towards the state. In the meantime, Texas Legal professional Common Henry Wade represented the state towards Roe, resulting in the case’s title “Roe v Wade”.

McCorvey’s case was certainly one of many throughout the nation supported by pro-abortion rights teams and made its method via a number of hearings and appeals earlier than arriving on the Supreme Court docket.

The court docket dominated with a 7-2 majority that the Texas regulation was unconstitutional.

By that point, Roe had already given beginning to her third baby, however the Supreme Court docket determined to proceed with the case, ruling her problem was “able to repetition” and subsequently overcame the “mootness doctrine”.

What has occurred since?

The 1973 Roe v Wade resolution sparked an enormous backlash, notably amongst spiritual conservatives. It has remained a wedge challenge in US federal elections for many years.

Some distinguished liberals, together with former Supreme Court docket Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, have criticised the 1973 resolution for grounding the argument on constitutional rights to privateness and never equality, which she argued would have been simpler to defend.

The ruling has been altered by a number of subsequent Supreme Court docket circumstances, notably the 1992 Deliberate Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v Casey case, wherein the justices dominated that states couldn’t implement restrictions on abortions that created an “undue burden” for the person looking for an abortion.

The ruling additionally did away with the trimester system that dictated when a state may limit abortion, as an alternative making a extra versatile definition of the medical viability of the being pregnant.

Nonetheless, a number of state legislatures have moved to create workarounds to the ruling, most not too long ago with Texas passing a regulation that enables anybody to sue a person who “aids and abets” an abortion.

The present problem to Roe v Wade, from which the draft opinion was leaked, considerations a Mississippi regulation that bans abortions after 15 weeks of being pregnant.

At the very least 22 states at the moment have some type of abortion bans on their books, though they can not at the moment constitutionally be enacted, in keeping with the Guttmacher Institute.

A lot of these bans would go into impact instantly or inside a number of days if the Roe v Wade verdict is formally struck down.

Australia hikes interest rates in potential election shakeup | Business and Economy

Reserve Financial institution of Australia’s transfer means tens of millions of Australians face increased repayments on their dwelling loans.

Australia’s central financial institution has raised rates of interest for the primary time in additional than a decade, following the lead of a rising record of Asia-Pacific economies taking motion to tame rising inflation.

The Reserve Financial institution of Australia (RBA) on Tuesday raised the benchmark rate of interest to 0.35 %, up from a file low of 0.1 %.

The primary charge hike since late 2010 comes after Australia’s client costs surged on the quickest tempo in twenty years through the first quarter on the again of surging petrol, dwelling constructing and meals prices.

The upper benchmark charge – which displays the curiosity banks cost on loans to one another – means tens of millions of Australians will face increased repayments on their dwelling loans.

The typical holder of a 500,000 Australian greenback ($355,000) mortgage might pay an additional 65 Australian {dollars} ($46) a month in repayments if banks move on the upper rate of interest in full, in accordance with information from RateCity.

Mariano Kulish, an economics professor on the College of Sydney who previously labored on the RBA, mentioned the central financial institution’s choice marked a “massive change” from its comparatively relaxed stance on inflation only a few months beforehand.

“I believe there are two massive components,”  Kulish instructed Al Jazeera. “One is that financial coverage normalisation has already began in the US. Superior economies are involved.”

“I believe the final two readings of inflation… suggests they received a really massive shock and they’re involved with inflation changing into ingrained or extra persistent right here, so it justifies transferring sooner somewhat than later,” he mentioned.

Tim Harcourt, chief economist on the Institute for Public Coverage and Governance (IPPG) on the College of Know-how Sydney, mentioned the central financial institution had little selection however to announce a average charge hike as inflation has been working nicely forward of its 2-3 % goal.

“However this buys them area if the worldwide economic system slows all year long,” Harcourt instructed Al Jazeera. 

Australia’s annual charge of inflation hit 5.1 % within the January-March interval, the very best since 2001.

Whereas extensively anticipated, the RBA’s choice might have a big affect on the trajectory of Australia’s upcoming federal election on Could 21.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s Liberal Nationwide Get together has been trailing the centre-left Labor Get together within the race, which is being fought on a variety of points, together with the rising value of dwelling.

The RBA final raised rates of interest in the course of an election race in 2007, throughout John Howard’s unsuccessful bid to safe a fifth consecutive time period in energy.

Forward of the RBA’s choice, Morrison mentioned voters would perceive that a rise in rates of interest could be as a result of world occasions and never his authorities’s dealing with of the economic system.

“The state of affairs that Australia faces is a state of affairs confronted all world wide and I believe Australians perceive that,” Morrison instructed reporters.

Reserve Financial institution governor Philip Lowe mentioned the mixture of excessive inflation figures and proof of enhancing wage progress known as for the normalising of rates of interest after years of being on emergency footing.

“The board is dedicated to doing what is important to make sure that inflation in Australia returns to focus on over time,” he mentioned in a post-meeting assertion.

Australia is the most recent Asia-Pacific economic system to lift rates of interest in current weeks, following South Korea, Singapore and New Zealand.

US Supreme Court set to overturn landmark abortion ruling: Report | Women’s Rights News

Draft opinion obtained by Politico suggests justices are poised to overturn 1973 Roe v Wade, which allowed abortion throughout the US.

The Supreme Courtroom appears to be like poised to overturn a landmark ruling permitting abortion for ladies throughout the US, based on Politico journal.

The Washington, DC-based information outlet stated an preliminary draft majority opinion written by Justice Samuel Alito that it had obtained confirmed the courtroom had voted to strike down the 1973 Roe v Wade determination.

“Roe was egregiously incorrect from the beginning,” Alito wrote within the opinion, which was circulated among the many judges on February 10, 2022 and labelled as a “1st Draft” of the “Opinion of the Courtroom”.

4 of the opposite Republican-appointed justices – Clarence Thomas, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett – voted with Alito within the convention held among the many justices after listening to oral arguments in December, and continued to assist the opinion, Politico stated.

After an preliminary vote among the many justices following oral argument, one is assigned the bulk opinion and writes a draft, which is then circulated among the many judges.

Between the preliminary vote and the ruling being launched, the vote alignment can change and a ruling solely turns into last when it’s printed by the courtroom.

“We maintain that Roe and Casey should be overruled,” the draft added, referencing the 1992 case Deliberate Parenthood v Casey that affirmed Roe’s discovering of a constitutional proper to abortion companies however allowed states to put some constraints on the observe. “It’s time to heed the Structure and return the difficulty of abortion to the folks’s elected representatives.”

The draft opinion stems from a bid by Mississippi to revive its ban on abortion beginning at 15 weeks of being pregnant, which had been blocked by decrease courts.

The southern state had requested the justices to overturn Roe v Wade, in addition to the 1992 Casey ruling.

At arguments in December, all six conservative justices signalled that they’d uphold the Mississippi regulation, and 5 requested questions that steered that overruling Roe and Casey was a chance.

A lot of Republican-controlled states are at the moment attempting to limit abortion rights, with Oklahoma the latest.

The leak is an unprecedented disclosure of a draft Supreme Courtroom opinion. The Related Press information company stated if verified it could mark a “stunning revelation of the excessive courtroom’s secretive deliberation course of”.

The Supreme Courtroom and the White Home declined to touch upon the story.

Hundreds flee homes in US southwest as massive wildfire advances | Climate News

The Calf Canyon Wildfire east of Santa Fe, New Mexico, scorches a swath of land, threatens mountain communities.

Wind-whipped flames raced throughout pine-covered mountainsides within the US state of New Mexico on Monday, forcing residents to flee their houses and resulting in the evacuation of the state’s psychiatric hospital.

Lots of of households in an historic metropolis within the foothills of the Rocky Mountains have been instructed to evacuate instantly as intense winds and bone-dry situations fuelled the massive wildfire burning on the outskirts of city.

The blaze, dubbed the Calf Canyon Wildfire, had scorched greater than 41,682 hectares (102,998 acres), or greater than half the realm of New York Metropolis, as of Monday morning, in accordance with United States Forest Service officers in New Mexico.

It was 30 p.c contained as of Monday because it burned drought-parched vegetation northwest of the town of Las Vegas, dwelling to 13,000 folks.

“We’re making an attempt to accommodate and feed folks with skeleton crews. Lots of of individuals have misplaced their houses. It’s a rare tragedy,” mentioned Allen Affeldt, who owns a lodge in Las Vegas.

Thousands of firefighters and National Guard troops are battling destructive wildfires in the Southwest as more residents are preparing to evacuate.
1000’s of firefighters and Nationwide Guard troops are battling harmful wildfires within the southwest as extra residents are getting ready to evacuate [New Mexico National Guard via AP]

The hearth, the most important lively US wildfire proper now, is certainly one of a dozen blazes now burning within the southwestern United States. Scientists say wildfires are extra widespread and arriving earlier this 12 months on account of local weather change.

Greater than 3,100 wildland firefighters and assist personnel have been combating fires throughout the nation, with about one-third of them making an attempt to stop the large blaze in New Mexico from spreading.

“This can be very smoked out right here. A number of smoke and falling ash,” Jesus Romero, the deputy county supervisor of San Miguel County, instructed the Reuters information company in an interview.

“The winds are beginning to decide up now and we’re beginning to get much more wind.”

Forecasters issued a pink flag warning for the realm, signalling that fires might begin and unfold simply, amid winds of 80kph (50mph) and humidity as little as 5 p.c anticipated by Monday.

State well being officers mentioned they started evacuating all 197 sufferers on the Behavioral Well being Institute because of the fast-moving hearth.

Sufferers have been being despatched to different amenities across the state, with some being transported in secured models and others escorted by police.

A number of hundred households within the northwestern nook of Las Vegas have been instructed to evacuate instantly on Monday morning, San Miguel County mentioned in an alert.

“This rising scenario stays extraordinarily severe and refusal to evacuate may very well be a deadly choice,” the county mentioned.

One other 4,000 to five,000 folks have been instructed to be able to evacuate instantly, Romero mentioned.

Crews bulldozed hearth breaks to the north and west of the historic college city to guard ranches, rural homes and the United World Faculty.

A New Mexico National Guard truck is ready to deliver potable water to communities in response to the Calf Canyon/Hermits Peak fire in northern New Mexico.
A New Mexico Nationwide Guard truck is able to ship potable water to communities in response to the hearth [New Mexico National Guard via AP]

Officers have mentioned the northeastern New Mexico hearth, which has been burning since April 6, has broken or destroyed 172 houses and at the very least 116 buildings.

The residents of close by communities have been instructed to evacuate on Sunday as robust wind gusts drove the hearth close to their mountain valley communities.

Throughout New Mexico, officers and teams have been amassing meals, water and different provides for the 1000’s of individuals displaced by the fires.

Affords of prayers and hope flooded social media as residents posted pictures of the flames torching the tops of towering ponderosa pines close to their houses.

Forecasters have issued hearth climate watches and pink flag warnings for excessive hearth hazard throughout extensive swaths of New Mexico and western Texas.